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Healthy Longevity
The NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, together with Prof. Brian Kennedy and Prof. Andrea Maier are proud to be hosting the Healthy Longevity webinar series.

In this Healthy Longevity series, we envision a gamut of disciplines from academic research to industrial markets to address critical healthcare concerns in the world today. These strategies broadly include (but are not limited to):
* Surpassing treatment of individual diseases to healthspan and lifespan extension
* Veering the focus of managing isolated diseases to preventing multiple diseases..

Ageing is the primary driver of chronic diseases in older and elderly individuals. Poor ageing is characterized by reduced or impaired function of multiple organ systems, including the cardiorespiratory, metabolic, immune and musculoskeletal systems.

The current model of clinical medicine is reactive and disease-centric, focusing on secondary and tertiary treatment of age-related diseases. With the burgeoning ageing populations across the world, including Singapore, this prevailing approach may not be the most efficient method of alleviating the current health care burden.

Healthcare cost is a ticking time bomb for ageing!

This virtual series will bring together highly-esteemed and prominent speakers from a wide range of fields associated with ageing, spanning from large and small biotech industries to academic institutions. You will hear revolutionary insights from experts on the growing and evolving science of ageing. As well, be informed of the prospects of combatting and preventing the debilitating ageing process through multi-disciplinary and integrated approaches aimed at extending both healthspan and lifespan.

We cordially invite you to join us in this exciting line-up of events. Hope to see you then.
Oct 6, 2022 07:00 PM
Oct 13, 2022 07:00 PM
Oct 20, 2022 07:00 PM
Nov 3, 2022 07:00 PM
Nov 10, 2022 07:00 PM
Nov 17, 2022 07:00 PM
Dec 1, 2022 07:00 PM
Dec 8, 2022 07:00 PM
Dec 15, 2022 07:00 PM
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Speakers

Host: Prof Brian Kennedy
Distinguished Professor in Biochemistry and Physiology @NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
Prof Brian Kennedy is the Director of the Healthy Longevity Translational Research Programme at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Director at the Centre for Healthy Longevity of National University Healthcare System (NUHS). Prof Kennedy has been at the forefront of ageing research in the past two decades and has made significant contributions to our basic understanding of ageing biology. His current efforts focus on bringing lab-proven science and health extending molecules to the clinic, such that “Healthy Longevity” medicine is going to be available for everyone in the near future.
Host: Prof Andrea Maier
Oon Chiew Seng Professor in Medicine, Healthy Ageing and Dementia Research @NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
Prof Andrea B Maier, MD, is the Co-Director at the Centre for Healthy Longevity, National University Health System (NUHS). Throughout her 15-year career, Prof Maier has contributed tremendously to the clinical and biological understanding of human ageing and age-related diseases. Her current focus is to develop Longevity Medicine as a clinical and academic discipline by enabling the acceleration of basic science towards human trials and clinic practice. With her research and leadership, healthy longevity will not only exist as a lab-proven concept but will soon become part of everyone’s life.
Guest: Dr Enej Kuščer (1 Sep 2022)
CEO @Longevize
Dr Kuščer is a biotechnology entrepreneur, co-founder and CEO of several biotechnology companies including Acies Bio, Comet Therapeutics and now Longevize. His work ranges from synthetic biology and microbial engineering through drug discovery with small molecules for rare genetic diseases and systems-biology approach to human longevity. Enej has a great passion for life and the beauty of this unique planet among stars, which translates to his motivation for building a more sustainable zero-waste bio-based future with one of his startups, and developing means and technologies for people to enjoy happy, healthy and more synergistic life in that beautiful future for much longer than we think is possible today.
Guest: Professor Luigi Fontana (15 Sep 2022)
Professor of Medicine and Nutrition @The University of Sydney
Professor Luigi Fontana is an internationally recognized physician scientist and one of the world’s leaders in the field of nutrition and healthy longevity in humans. His pioneering clinical studies on the effects of dietary restriction have opened a new area of nutrition-related research that holds tremendous promise for the prevention of age-related chronic diseases. His research has delivered a paradigm shift in the understanding of how dietary restriction, by slowing the accumulation of metabolic and molecular damage, deeply influence human aging biology and the initiation, progression and prognosis of many clinical conditions, ranging from obesity to type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer.
Guest: Prof Rong Li (6 Oct 2022)
Director @Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore
Professor Rong Li came from Johns Hopkins University where she served as the Director of the Center for Cell Dynamics in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She has had over 25 years of independent research on cellular dynamics and mechanics employing interdisciplinary approaches. She was recruited to NUS in 2019 as the second Director of MBI succeeding Professor Michael Sheetz. The diverse projects in Professor Rong Li’s lab contribute to two main research thrusts: cell and tissue aging; cellular and organismal adaptation. The study on aging focuses on understanding dynamic changes of crucial cellular components during the aging process and how these changes alter the mechanical functions of cells and tissues. The insights gained will be applied to the development of new methods for prolonging healthy aging and the repair and regeneration of deteriorated functions.